HofmanDujardin Provides An Innovative Space For Mourning

Architecture buffs, Michiel Hofman and Barabara Dujardin, founded the company behind cutting edge design projects such as law firms, business offices, villas, and ships. Perhaps one of HofmanDujardin’s greatest conquests was one that was deeply personal and sobering – the Funeral Ceremony Centre. With a focus on  people rather than buildings alone, the duo set out to reinvent the sacred ceremony for the deceased by constructing an intimate space that ultimately modernises funerals.

The building itself is anomalous albeit fitting for the occasion. A wide base walled by glass opens to the lush scene of nature outside, funnelling to a centrum where a loved one’s coffin is elevated. The angled walls are tall and a feathery white, generous expanse for the plethora of emotions to be had. The innovation behind the design of HofmanDujardin’s Funeral Ceremony Centre can be pinpointed to three rooms surrounding the crux of the structure, the casket.

The first room involves the assembling of family and friends as they congregate for the mourning. It is an enclave that offers a comforting view of the scenic greenery and most importantly, features a multimedia screen that occupies its walls. This memory wall, as HofmanDujardin’s website names it, encapsulates the gathering people in the essence of their loved one. Photos and videos can be shared by family and friends for all to mutually relive.

The second room is the pinnacle of the Funeral Ceremony Centre. Guests gather in the pyramidal space, their attention channeled towards the coffin and the space that extends ahead. It is here that interpretations can be made. The living dwell in the triangular part but all face a path that becomes narrower and narrower, until we are met with a world beyond as death gently plucks us.

Lastly, the third room allows guests to be immersed in a neutral yet lively room where a sense of closure is defined. This area becomes buzzing with social interaction and encourages strengthening relationships in light of the occasion. The room is distinct in that it features wooden walls and floorboards, accentuated by round halos of light. Exuding comfort and ease, guests can leave with an experience that is ceremonial and incredibly special. HofmanDujardin’s Funeral Ceremony Centre is an exemplary model for how architecture and humanity can coincide to not only function – but to honour life.

All images courtesy of HofmanDujardin