House Cylinder: The Volumetric Vision Of Cyril Lancelin

Cyril Lancelin, an architect from Lyon, France has been a popular name within the realm of architecture. In 2016, he decided to start his own creative studio, town.and.concrete, with a focus on habits and the limitations they bring. His work is often attributed to a set of unusual structures, yet utilising classic forms, which create grandiose experiential art. He uses geometrical shapes to push the boundaries of sculpture and architecture. His largest project was a colossal installation in Hangzhou, China entitled “Knot”. In addition, he has recently presented two installations in Philadelphia: The Pyramid Sphere and the Pyramid Tube.

Working in his childhood town of Lyon, Lancelin presented the design prototypes of “cylinder”, a multi-sculpture habitat project composed of large glass volumetric spheres where one could ultimately live in. The idea of the project bases itself on juxtaposing cylinders, whether opened, or closed to enhance delimitation of space. Nonetheless, its large, glass windows highlight its natural aspect – a way to escape the inner confinement of a home.

Through “cylinder”, Lancelin’s vision takes shape: a habitat within nature, within the trees – being a part of the outside world. Everything being open to the outside, its undulating facades, and its lack of corridors emphasise sensation s of freedom, of liberty, felt by those who occupy the space. In its essence, “cylinder” is evidence for living within nature rather than destroying it, to live.

All images, courtesy of town.and.concrete