Explorer Is World's First Full-Body Medical Scanner

Image: UC Davis

During IEEE MIC 2018 Total-Body PET workshop were unveiled the fist body images scanned by EXPLORER. This medical device is the world's first full-body scanner. It joins positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT). Following long periods of research, a model, primate-sized scanner was uncovered in 2016. After far reaching testing, the principal human-sized device was created in mid 2018.

EXPLORER was created in a cooperation between researchers from UC Davis and engineers from Shanghai-based United Imaging Healthcare. The outcomes are being depicted as completely revolutionising both clinical research and patient care. This scanner model works 40 times faster than traditional PET scans and it produces 3D scan of the entire body in just few seconds. This implies the scanner can deliver complete images utilising definitely little dosages of radiation. Additionally, the higher perceptiveness enables clinicians to picture certain atomic focuses on that are past the cutoff points of current scanning frameworks.

"The tradeoff between image quality, acquisition time and injected radiation dose will vary for different applications, but in all cases, we can scan better, faster or with less radiation dose, or some combination of these," says Simon Cherry, from the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. The most thrilling and innovative use of this new scanning device is its capacity to catch whole body in single quick scans. Current PET frameworks are on a very basic level inefficient, because of the need of filtering single bits of the body at one time. This fact restricts clinicians capacity to study the impacts of something moving over the whole body in real time.

"The level of detail was astonishing, especially once we got the reconstruction method a bit more optimized," says Ramsey Badawi, chief of Nuclear Medicine at UC Davis Health. "We could see features that you just don't see on regular PET scans. And the dynamic sequence showing the radiotracer moving around the body in three dimensions over time was, frankly, mind-blowing. There is no other device that can obtain data like this in humans, so this is truly novel."

Image: UC Davis

Image: UC Davis

Image: UC Davis